Thanksgiving Plan: Rose

thanksgiving.jpgWe’ve talked before in this blog about the importance of always having a plan, but we think it bears repeating, especially with Thanksgiving just around the corner.  We were reminded of this during a session with our dieter Rose last week.  We asked Rose, who is having Thanksgiving with relatives a couple of hours away from her house, what her food plan was for that day.  She responded that she didn’t really have a formal plan but was sure she’d just stay within her normal 1,500 calorie diet that day. 

We asked Rose what would be the disadvantages of making a written plan for Thanksgiving Day (it’s important to make a plan for the whole day, not just Thanksgiving dinner).  Rose admitted that one of the downsides would be that she wouldn’t feel as free to try different foods.  We discussed with Rose the fact that she can’t have it both ways – she can’t eat whatever she wants when she wants it if she wants to lose weight and keep it off.  We asked her if she thought she’d be more likely to stay within her calorie limit if she had a written plan and Rose answered yes, it was much more likely if she had a plan.  Because Rose reaffirmed that her goal is to lose weight and keep it off, she decided she wanted to do everything she can to reach that goal – including making a Thanksgiving plan.  As part of her plan, Rose decided that for this one day she would plan to eat an extra 300 calories, which would allow her to eat a little bit of everything she wants and not feel deprived.  Rose recognized that if she didn’t plan to eat this extra 300 calories, she might not stick to her plan and could end up eating hundreds more than she had planned. 

We also asked Rose to imagine stepping on the scale the day after Thanksgiving.  If she didn’t make a plan, it is likely that she could have gone over her limit by a couple hundred calories (if not a couple of thousand).  Rose envisioned that in this scenario she would feel guilty and weak, and angry with herself for overeating.  If Rose did make a plan, she was likely to stick with it and not over eat. Then Rose saw herself stepping on the scale and feeling proud and happy – and incredibly glad that she hadn’t overeaten. 

With these powerful images in mind, and also with the resolve that she would do whatever it takes to reach her goal, Rose made a written plan for Thanksgiving Day and feels confident that now she will handle the situation with ease. 

Dealing with Hunger

Mark, a dieter that we recently began working with, reported that during the past week he’s been feeling extra hungry, which is making it more difficult for him to stay within his calorie limit for the day.  The first thing we discussed with Mark is the fact that this is completely normal.  All of our dieters have periods of time when they are hungrier than others. Although they often say, “I had such a hard week; I was hungry all the time,” it usually turns out they were only hungry for a couple of hours during a few days that week, but let the memory of that hunger color the entire week.

We told Mark that if it’s not time for one of his preplanned snacks or meals and he’s feeling hungry, there are lots of things he can say to himself.  First he can remind himself that hunger is never an emergency – it can be somewhat uncomfortable but he’s lived through much worse physical discomfort in the past (a badly broken arm, a root canal, and a popped kneecap).  Mark can also remind himself that there’s always another meal coming and that he’s going to be eating again fairly soon. Last, Mark can tell himself that just because he’s hungry doesn’t mean he should eat – if he wants to get and stay thinner, he simply can’t eat every time he feels like it. 

We also asked Mark if what he’s been feeling lately is always hunger, or whether he might be confusing it with a craving or a desire to eat (Day 11 of The Beck Diet Solution).  We urged Mark to pay attention to the physical sensations attached to his “hunger” and try to discern whether it really is true hunger.  Mark related that he had been working fewer hours this week, and it’s possible that he felt at loose ends and therefore felt like eating, as opposed to being hungry.   

We proposed an experiment for Mark to try: for one or two days this week, he’s going to spend almost all of his calories on protein and vegetables and limit carbohydrates and starches.  Many of our dieters have tried this experiment and were surprised to see how much more full and satisfied they felt when they varied their diet in this way.  We told Mark to give it a try, and if the same is true for him then at least for now, when he’s feeling more hungry, it’s probably worth his while to incorporate more protein into his diet. 

Traveling and TBDS

We received this letter from a Beck Diet Solution reader and frequent traveler:

My concerns are that I travel nearly every week for work.  I have been on the program at home so far which is easy.  How will I be able to manage this when I am traveling?  I think for those of us who are road warriors, we often find ourselves hungry, stressed, tired, and without many choices as far as what we can eat.  I have been stuck in airports where there is little healthy food or stuck in airports when all shops are closed so that my dinner must come from a vending machine or I will not eat at all.  This is true with hotels too.  Sometimes I end up in a hotel which does not have room service so if I don’t eat before I get there, then I don’t eat! Here are some of my ideas: 

-Continue to eat slowly while seated.
-Remember that it is okay to be hungry–I won’t die from it!
Don’t get the key to the mini bar!
Really watch portions and always get a salad.
Avoid alcohol.
Ask for crudités with dip on the side even if it’s not on the menu.
Eat an apple before going out to dinner.
Stay hydrated.

I don’t know if this is enough for me to be able to reduce my caloric intake enough to actually lose weight while traveling.  Do you have any other suggestions?

We thought this letter was a great illustration of a problem many people face.  The suggestions are excellent, and we have a couple to add:

1. Because you’re going to be eating out so much more when traveling and are at risk for taking in a lot more calories, consider ordering a salad with the dressing on the side and topped with a lean protein.
2. Plan ahead!  If you know you’re going to be arriving too late to buy a decent dinner, bring travel-friendly food with you, such as tuna fish in a can or pouch, processed cheese that doesn’t require refrigeration, fruit, high fiber/high protein bars, or nuts.
3. Ask for a mini fridge for your hotel room and stock it with foods you can eat.
4. Try to avoid buffets, but if you do find yourself eating at them, survey all the food first, pick two or three things to eat, and then don’t go back for seconds.
5. When eating out, remind yourself that if you want to be thinner, you can’t have appetizers, bread with your entree, and dessert.  Make compromises!

We also recommend you read (or reread) Day 32 of The Beck Diet Solution and if necessary, bring the book with you on your travels to keep everything fresh in your mind. 

If you have any more suggestions, we’d love to hear them.

Regaining Momentum: Jenny

Our dieter Jenny has been going through a rough time because her step-mother (whom she was very close to) passed away recently.  Jenny was having a very tough time staying motivated to stick to her diet.  She told us that although she’s still reading her Advantages List every day (Day 1 of The Beck Diet Solution), most of the items no longer feel important to her. “What does being thinner really matter anyway, compared to my step-mother’s death?” she asked us. 

To help Jenny, we asked her to imagine her life a couple of months from now and consider how she might feel then.  She was able to see that while being thinner doesn’t feel important to her right now, it will later on. We asked for some specific examples of when it might feel important. Jenny said that she had a special meeting coming up and that she did want to feel more self-confident for it. She also told us about a high school reunion that will take place soon and that it felt important to her to be thinner and more self-assured  when meeting her old classmates. 

We also asked Jenny to reflect back on what her life was like before she lost weight and consider how being thinner positively impacts her life today.  Jenny thought about it and realized that even now, among other things, she did enjoy being able to fit comfortably into chairs, being able to move around easily without getting tired, and she certainly enjoyed the fact that her weight loss enabled her to stop using her sleep apnea machine.

Jenny concluded that even though sticking to her diet had currently stopped feeling important to her, it was only temporary and she definitely would care in the months and years to come.  She also realized that she never wanted to go back to how things were before she lost weight, and that alone was enough to bring back her motivation and sense of purpose.